While in the past intergovernmental pacts included only states as parties, the federal government has recently participated in some pacts. [73] Indeed, some covenants require a representative of the federal government to participate in compact governance. For example, the Woodrow Wilson Bridge and Tunnel Compact requires that a thirteen-member board member that regulates the pact be appointed by the U.S. Secretary of Transportation, as mentioned above. [74] Some covenants have been implemented by Congress in federal law and provide for direct involvement of the federal government in matters covered by the pact, such as for example. B the Interstate Agreement on Detainers[75], which applies to the transfer of prisoners convicted for unrelated trials. The Constitution contains the compact clause that prohibits a state from entering into a pact with another state without the consent of Congress. While intergovernmental covenants are binding treaties between states parties, pact treaties approved by Congress also become federal law. The Supreme Court ruled that a boundary between states, agreed in an intergovernmental pact approved by Congress, „is of binding force and eventually establishes the boundary between them, which functions with the same effect as a treaty between sovereign powers.” [21] In Cuyler v. Adams, according to the Tribunal, if Congress agrees to an intergovernmental pact and „the subject matter of that agreement is an appropriate subject for congressional legislation, congressional approval converts the agreement of the states into federal law under the Covenant clause.” [22] The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circle clarified that the pacts approved by Congress, which do not threaten the preponderance of the Alliance, but deal with matters appropriate to congressional legislation, are still federal in nature, whereas such an agreement was not necessary. [23] According to the Constitution, the U.S.

Supreme Court has initial jurisdiction over interstate litigation[24] and the Court of Justice will apply intergovernmental treaties in accordance with the principles of contract law. [25] As a treaty, an intergovernmental covenant primarily concerns the rights and obligations of states that have chosen to become contracting parties and their respective citizens, since the covenant is adopted by their respective legislators as law. However, some covenants go so far as to look specifically at the impact (if any) of these covenants on States that are not parties.. . . .