a formal agreement between the governments of different countries on how they should behave among themselves or vis-à-vis the populations of their country There are several reasons why an otherwise valid and agreed treaty can be rejected as a binding international agreement, most of which involve problems posed by the constitution of the treaty. [Citation required] For example, the Japanese-Korean series treaties of 1905, 1907 and 1910 were protested; [17] and the 1965 Treaty on Fundamental Relations between Japan and the Republic of Korea confirmed them as „already null and void.” [18] The signing of a treaty implies that the signing of a treaty implies recognition, that the other party is a sovereign State and that the envisaged agreement is applicable in international law. United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification: an international agreement to help countries where land becomes so dry due to rain that it cannot be used for agriculture If a treaty does not contain provisions for other agreements or measures, only the text of the treaty is legally binding. . . .